Advisor(s)

Karen L. Kier, PhD
Ohio Northern University
Pharmacy Practice
k-kier@onu.edu

Document Type

Video

Start Date

23-4-2021 9:00 AM

Description

Our research was developed to explore risk factors for developing severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 849 adults ages 18-100 with a positive COVID-19 test between March 21, 2020 and January 14, 2021 admitted to the hospital. We excluded any prior admissions for patients that were later readmitted and who were discharged from or died in the emergency department. We gathered data from electronic medical records (EMRs), including demographics, if they came from a nursing/group home, comorbidities, smoking, peak lab values, severity of disease, length of stay, intubation, and medications. The primary outcome was disease severity, including if the patient was intubated and/or died. Secondary outcomes included length of stay and intubation, as well as the number of days on a ventilator if intubated. After running our data with SPSS, BMI was the greatest risk factor (p = 0.001) influencing disease severity through death. Being over 65 years in conjunction with increased BMI (p = 0.037) was more predictive. As other studies have reported, we observed that as BMI increased, disease severity increased. We found that 38.5% of underweight patients died: something not talked about as frequently in current literature.

Notes

This presentation is part of the Honors Capstone Enhancement Presentation series.

Open Access

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Apr 23rd, 9:00 AM

A Retrospective Chart Review of Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients and Analyzing Risk Factors for Severe COVID-19 Disease

Our research was developed to explore risk factors for developing severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). We performed a retrospective cohort study of 849 adults ages 18-100 with a positive COVID-19 test between March 21, 2020 and January 14, 2021 admitted to the hospital. We excluded any prior admissions for patients that were later readmitted and who were discharged from or died in the emergency department. We gathered data from electronic medical records (EMRs), including demographics, if they came from a nursing/group home, comorbidities, smoking, peak lab values, severity of disease, length of stay, intubation, and medications. The primary outcome was disease severity, including if the patient was intubated and/or died. Secondary outcomes included length of stay and intubation, as well as the number of days on a ventilator if intubated. After running our data with SPSS, BMI was the greatest risk factor (p = 0.001) influencing disease severity through death. Being over 65 years in conjunction with increased BMI (p = 0.037) was more predictive. As other studies have reported, we observed that as BMI increased, disease severity increased. We found that 38.5% of underweight patients died: something not talked about as frequently in current literature.