Event Title

Can External Catheters Prevent Pressure Ulcers?

Advisor(s)

Jamie Hunsicker, DNP
Ohio Northern University
Nursing, Health & Behavioral Sciences
j-hunsicker@onu.edu

Megan Lieb, DNP
Ohio Northern University
Nursing, Health & Behavioral Sciences
m-lieb.2@onu.edu

Document Type

Poster

Location

ONU McIntosh Center; Activities Room

Start Date

22-4-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

April 2022

Abstract

Problem: Pressure ulcers can be very harmful and dangerous to patients. Many interventions can help with pressure ulcer development but are external catheters an appropriate intervention in incontinence patients to prevent moisture associated pressure injuries.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether external catheters are an appropriate intervention for preventing pressure ulcers because urinary incontinence is one of the main factors and causes of moisture associated pressure ulcers.

Methods: This is an experimental study focused on the effectiveness of external catheters. The participants will be older adults over the age of 70 who are incontinent of urine and will be selected as they are admitted to the hospital and placed into two different groups. The intervention will be the use of the external catheter in one group while the other receives normal care. The study will monitor pressure ulcer development between the two groups.

Evaluation: The PUSH scale will be used to measure the pressure ulcers and monitor their development once each shift by the nurses.

Conclusions: Determining if external catheters are a reliable option in incontinent patients to prevent pressure ulcers can be vital towards a patient receiving care. It can change the way nurses treat and care for those patients at risk of developing moisture associated pressure ulcers.

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Apr 22nd, 1:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Can External Catheters Prevent Pressure Ulcers?

ONU McIntosh Center; Activities Room

Problem: Pressure ulcers can be very harmful and dangerous to patients. Many interventions can help with pressure ulcer development but are external catheters an appropriate intervention in incontinence patients to prevent moisture associated pressure injuries.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether external catheters are an appropriate intervention for preventing pressure ulcers because urinary incontinence is one of the main factors and causes of moisture associated pressure ulcers.

Methods: This is an experimental study focused on the effectiveness of external catheters. The participants will be older adults over the age of 70 who are incontinent of urine and will be selected as they are admitted to the hospital and placed into two different groups. The intervention will be the use of the external catheter in one group while the other receives normal care. The study will monitor pressure ulcer development between the two groups.

Evaluation: The PUSH scale will be used to measure the pressure ulcers and monitor their development once each shift by the nurses.

Conclusions: Determining if external catheters are a reliable option in incontinent patients to prevent pressure ulcers can be vital towards a patient receiving care. It can change the way nurses treat and care for those patients at risk of developing moisture associated pressure ulcers.