Advisor(s)

Natalie DiPietro Mager, PhD
Ohio Northern University
Pharmacy Practice
n-dipietro@onu.edu

Karen Kier, PhD
Ohio Northern University
Pharmacy Practice
k-kier@onu.edu

Document Type

Conference Proceedings

Location

ONU McIntosh Center; Dean's Heritage Room

Start Date

22-4-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

22-4-2022 2:00 PM

Abstract

Background: Individuals living in primary care health professional shortage areas (PCHPSAs) experience health inequities. Community pharmacists are healthcare professionals with an opportunity to provide care to underserved populations. The objective of this study was to compare non-dispensing services provided by Ohio community pharmacists in PCHPSAs and non-PCHSPAs.

Methods: An electronic, IRB-approved 19-item survey was sent to all community pharmacists practicing in full PCHPSA counties and a random sample practicing in non-PCHPSA counties in Ohio (n=324). Questions assessed current provision of non-dispensing services as well as interest and barriers regarding such services.

Results: Seventy-three usable responses were received (23% response rate). Respondents in non-PCHPSAs were more likely to recognize their county’s PCHPSA status than those in a PCHPSA (p=0.008). Pharmacies in non-PCHPSAs were significantly more likely to offer 11 or more non-dispensing services than those in PCHPSAs (p=0.002). Nearly 60% of respondents in non-PCHPSAs reported starting a new non-dispensing service due to the COVID-19 pandemic compared to 27% of pharmacies in full PCHPSA counties (p=0.009). Barriers to providing non-dispensing services were reported, but interest in learning more information about providing such services was high among both groups.

Conclusion: Community pharmacists practicing in PCHPSA could positively impact their community if they were able to provide more opportunities for care for patients. The implications of this research may support the continued need for pharmacists in promoting public health and community efforts in PCHPSAs. Efforts for pharmacists to provide more non-dispensing services in PCHPSA could provide better access to care and promote health equity.

Open Access

Available to all.

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Apr 22nd, 1:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Pharmacists Provision of Non-Dispensing Services in Health Professional Shortage Areas

ONU McIntosh Center; Dean's Heritage Room

Background: Individuals living in primary care health professional shortage areas (PCHPSAs) experience health inequities. Community pharmacists are healthcare professionals with an opportunity to provide care to underserved populations. The objective of this study was to compare non-dispensing services provided by Ohio community pharmacists in PCHPSAs and non-PCHSPAs.

Methods: An electronic, IRB-approved 19-item survey was sent to all community pharmacists practicing in full PCHPSA counties and a random sample practicing in non-PCHPSA counties in Ohio (n=324). Questions assessed current provision of non-dispensing services as well as interest and barriers regarding such services.

Results: Seventy-three usable responses were received (23% response rate). Respondents in non-PCHPSAs were more likely to recognize their county’s PCHPSA status than those in a PCHPSA (p=0.008). Pharmacies in non-PCHPSAs were significantly more likely to offer 11 or more non-dispensing services than those in PCHPSAs (p=0.002). Nearly 60% of respondents in non-PCHPSAs reported starting a new non-dispensing service due to the COVID-19 pandemic compared to 27% of pharmacies in full PCHPSA counties (p=0.009). Barriers to providing non-dispensing services were reported, but interest in learning more information about providing such services was high among both groups.

Conclusion: Community pharmacists practicing in PCHPSA could positively impact their community if they were able to provide more opportunities for care for patients. The implications of this research may support the continued need for pharmacists in promoting public health and community efforts in PCHPSAs. Efforts for pharmacists to provide more non-dispensing services in PCHPSA could provide better access to care and promote health equity.