Advisor(s)

Jessica Hinson, PharmD
Ohio Northern University
Pharmacy Practice
j-hinson@onu.edu

Karen Kier, PhD
Ohio Northern University
Pharmacy Practice
k-kier@onu.edu

Document Type

Conference Proceedings

Location

ONU McIntosh Center; Wishing Well

Start Date

22-4-2022 12:00 PM

End Date

22-4-2022 1:00 PM

Abstract

Imposter phenomenon (IP) is a collection of thoughts and ideas of inadequacy and an inability to recognize achievements and internalize successes. A focus group (conducted using the Delphi technique) was performed with six P5 students (who interned with ONU Healthwise) after given the IP-Clance scale to discuss personal experiences with IP with the goal of understanding the impact of IP on social and personal experiences. Participating students were educated on IP and the evaluation of their scores. Questions were designed by researchers to explore impact of IP in life experiences and methods of overcoming IP. Sessions were recorded and analysis was conducted to evaluate responses.

Analysis found that all participants had experienced IP, most often during their academic curriculum as well as in childhood and adolescence. Situations where participants encountered IP most frequently were school and work. Students said that IP did not hinder academic/social involvement, although pushing themselves out of their comfort zone caused anxiety as there is a deep desire to prove oneself. In addition, the students stated that IP comes in waves, that stress increases incidence, and a lack of confidence and overthinking cannot overcome IP despite positive outcomes. To alleviate IP, students reported talking to others for external validation, but described a reverse dichotomy of a difficulty with talking to others for a desire to seem confident and competent. This focus group concluded that IP creates a cascade of stress, but using a strong support system was most helpful in alleviating distress caused by IP.

Keywords: Imposter Phenomenon, Imposter Syndrome, IP, focus group, pharmacy, education, academia, Delphi, Delphi Technique

Notes

This presentation is part of the Honors Capstone Enhancement Presentation series.

This presentation was created and researched alongside "Focus Group Evaluation of Imposter Phenomenon and Its Impact on College Education and Perception of Future Opportunities" by Hunter Roach.

Open Access

Available to all.

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 PM Apr 22nd, 1:00 PM

Focus Group analysis of Imposter Phenomenon and Impact on Social and Personal Experience

ONU McIntosh Center; Wishing Well

Imposter phenomenon (IP) is a collection of thoughts and ideas of inadequacy and an inability to recognize achievements and internalize successes. A focus group (conducted using the Delphi technique) was performed with six P5 students (who interned with ONU Healthwise) after given the IP-Clance scale to discuss personal experiences with IP with the goal of understanding the impact of IP on social and personal experiences. Participating students were educated on IP and the evaluation of their scores. Questions were designed by researchers to explore impact of IP in life experiences and methods of overcoming IP. Sessions were recorded and analysis was conducted to evaluate responses.

Analysis found that all participants had experienced IP, most often during their academic curriculum as well as in childhood and adolescence. Situations where participants encountered IP most frequently were school and work. Students said that IP did not hinder academic/social involvement, although pushing themselves out of their comfort zone caused anxiety as there is a deep desire to prove oneself. In addition, the students stated that IP comes in waves, that stress increases incidence, and a lack of confidence and overthinking cannot overcome IP despite positive outcomes. To alleviate IP, students reported talking to others for external validation, but described a reverse dichotomy of a difficulty with talking to others for a desire to seem confident and competent. This focus group concluded that IP creates a cascade of stress, but using a strong support system was most helpful in alleviating distress caused by IP.

Keywords: Imposter Phenomenon, Imposter Syndrome, IP, focus group, pharmacy, education, academia, Delphi, Delphi Technique