Advisor(s)

Megan Lieb, DNP
Ohio Northern University
Nursing, Health & Behavioral Sciences
m-lieb.2@onu.edu

Jamie Hunsicker, DNP
Ohio Northern University
Health & Behavioral Sciences, Nursing
j-hunsicker@onu.edu

Document Type

Poster

Start Date

23-4-2021 9:00 AM

Description

Problem: In the U.S. today, 7% of hospitalized patients had incidence of pressure ulcers in some capacity (Hampton, 2016).

Purpose: The purpose of this project is to determine the effect of re-education on nurse competence regarding pressure ulcer prevention.

Methods: The results will be obtained via pre- and post-surveys to assess confidence and competence of nurse interventions with education being provided with pamphlets. Confidence and knowledge of pressure injury was measured using author-developed tests in the pre- and post-surveys. Education regarding pressure injury prevention was provided to Registered Nurses on the 7TH Floor Specialty Pediatrics unit participated in this project.

Pertinent Findings: It is expected that after education, nurse confidence and competency will be increased regarding pressure ulcer prevention.

Conclusions: Assuming these expectations, it would be concluded that re-education of nurses is an effective intervention in improving confidence and competency in their delivery of pressure ulcer prevention measures. These results will, in turn, result in better patient outcomes.

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Apr 23rd, 9:00 AM

Impact of Re-Education on Pressure Ulcer Prevention Practices by Medical Professionals

Problem: In the U.S. today, 7% of hospitalized patients had incidence of pressure ulcers in some capacity (Hampton, 2016).

Purpose: The purpose of this project is to determine the effect of re-education on nurse competence regarding pressure ulcer prevention.

Methods: The results will be obtained via pre- and post-surveys to assess confidence and competence of nurse interventions with education being provided with pamphlets. Confidence and knowledge of pressure injury was measured using author-developed tests in the pre- and post-surveys. Education regarding pressure injury prevention was provided to Registered Nurses on the 7TH Floor Specialty Pediatrics unit participated in this project.

Pertinent Findings: It is expected that after education, nurse confidence and competency will be increased regarding pressure ulcer prevention.

Conclusions: Assuming these expectations, it would be concluded that re-education of nurses is an effective intervention in improving confidence and competency in their delivery of pressure ulcer prevention measures. These results will, in turn, result in better patient outcomes.