Document Type

Poster

Start Date

24-4-2020 9:00 AM

Description

Researchers were interested in whether feelings of disgust towards food were impacted by specific textures and temperatures. Using apple products, participants were given puree, sauce, and slices served at a warm or cold temperature. 73 students (8 males and 65 females) with a mean age of 19 participated. A 3X2 mixed-subjects design was used, with texture as the within-subject factor and temperature as between. Results showed a main effect of texture F(2,138) = 24.802, p < .001, η2= .264. A post hoc test showed a significant difference between puree and slices, with puree being more disgusting, and between sauce and slices, with sauce being more disgusting. Additionally, there was a main effect of temperature F(1,69) = 6.444, p=.013, η2= .085, with warm products rated as more disgusting. Finally, there was a significant interaction between texture and temperature F(2,138) = 8.203, p < .001, η2=.106, such that, for both puree and slices, disgust ratings were higher in the warm condition. However, temperature did not significantly impact ratings of the sauce. Overall, findings show that participants’ disgust ratings when consuming foods are impacted by both the texture and the temperature of the food. This knowledge could help individuals incorporate healthier foods into their diets.

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM

The Effects of Texture and Temperature on Disgust Ratings for a Common Fruit

Researchers were interested in whether feelings of disgust towards food were impacted by specific textures and temperatures. Using apple products, participants were given puree, sauce, and slices served at a warm or cold temperature. 73 students (8 males and 65 females) with a mean age of 19 participated. A 3X2 mixed-subjects design was used, with texture as the within-subject factor and temperature as between. Results showed a main effect of texture F(2,138) = 24.802, p < .001, η2= .264. A post hoc test showed a significant difference between puree and slices, with puree being more disgusting, and between sauce and slices, with sauce being more disgusting. Additionally, there was a main effect of temperature F(1,69) = 6.444, p=.013, η2= .085, with warm products rated as more disgusting. Finally, there was a significant interaction between texture and temperature F(2,138) = 8.203, p < .001, η2=.106, such that, for both puree and slices, disgust ratings were higher in the warm condition. However, temperature did not significantly impact ratings of the sauce. Overall, findings show that participants’ disgust ratings when consuming foods are impacted by both the texture and the temperature of the food. This knowledge could help individuals incorporate healthier foods into their diets.