Faculty Advisor(s)

Edward S. Potkanowicz, Ph. D
Ohio Northern University
Human Performance and Sport Sciences
e-potkanowicz@onu.edu

Document Type

Poster

Start Date

24-4-2020 9:00 AM

Description

Fitness tracking apps are popular. There is little data validating their use during and after exercise. PURPOSE: Validate an iOS-based pulse oximeter against a fingertip pulse oximeter and a Polar® heart rate monitor during moderate intensity exercise and recovery. METHODS: Age Estimated Maximal Heart Rate (AEMHR) was calculated for fifteen college-aged students. Participants completed a 30-minute running trial divided into three 10-minute segments intended to elicit heart rate responses of 60, 70, and 80% of AEMHR. Heart rate and oxygen saturation data were collected at five and nine minutes of each segment. RESULTS: At 60% the digiDoc® app exhibited a low correlation when compared to the Polar® heart rate monitor. At 70% the digiDoc® app exhibited a low correlation when compared to the fingertip oximeter. During recovery the digiDoc® app exhibited high correlation values at 5PE and 10PE when compared to the Polar® heart rate monitor. The digiDoc® app exhibited a high correlation at 5PE when compared to the fingertip pulse oximeter. CONCLUSION: There is little evidence to suggest the digiDoc® app accurately measures pulse rate and oxygen saturation during exercise or recovery. However, various issues could have led to erroneous readings. This argues for the continuation of this work.

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM

An Examination of the Validity of an iOS-Based Heart Rate and Pulse Oximetry App During And after Moderate Intensity Exercise

Fitness tracking apps are popular. There is little data validating their use during and after exercise. PURPOSE: Validate an iOS-based pulse oximeter against a fingertip pulse oximeter and a Polar® heart rate monitor during moderate intensity exercise and recovery. METHODS: Age Estimated Maximal Heart Rate (AEMHR) was calculated for fifteen college-aged students. Participants completed a 30-minute running trial divided into three 10-minute segments intended to elicit heart rate responses of 60, 70, and 80% of AEMHR. Heart rate and oxygen saturation data were collected at five and nine minutes of each segment. RESULTS: At 60% the digiDoc® app exhibited a low correlation when compared to the Polar® heart rate monitor. At 70% the digiDoc® app exhibited a low correlation when compared to the fingertip oximeter. During recovery the digiDoc® app exhibited high correlation values at 5PE and 10PE when compared to the Polar® heart rate monitor. The digiDoc® app exhibited a high correlation at 5PE when compared to the fingertip pulse oximeter. CONCLUSION: There is little evidence to suggest the digiDoc® app accurately measures pulse rate and oxygen saturation during exercise or recovery. However, various issues could have led to erroneous readings. This argues for the continuation of this work.