Faculty Advisor(s)

Manoranjan S. D'Souza, Ph. D
Ohio Northern University
Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences
m-dsouza@onu.edu

Sarah Seeley, BA
Ohio Northern University
Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences
s-seeley.1@onu.edu

Document Type

Poster

Start Date

24-4-2020 9:00 AM

Description

Anxiety and depression affect a large number of individuals all over the world irrespective of social status, gender, race and ethnicity. Identification of genes associated with anxiety and depression will help in more targeted personalized treatments based on the patient’s genetic makeup. Mutations in regulator of gene protein signaling 1 (RGS1) protein have been associated with internalizing disorder in humans such as depression, anxiety, and OCD. Several studies have previously reported role of RGS1 in immune dysfunction. Interestingly, immune dysfunction has also been reported in patients suffering from depression. Importantly, in mice lacking RGS1 food chunking has been observed, which is suggestive of depression-like behavior. However, anxiety- and depression-like behavior has not been assessed in mice lacking RGS1. We will address this gap in knowledge by assessing anxiety-like (elevated plus maze) and depression-like behaviors (forced swim test and tail suspension) in mice lacking RGS1 and their wildtype counterparts. Based on the above described observation of food chunking, we hypothesize to see an increase in depression and anxiety in mice lacking RGS1. The data are currently being analyzed.

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM

Determining the Role of Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 Protein in Anxiety- and Depression-like Behavior.

Anxiety and depression affect a large number of individuals all over the world irrespective of social status, gender, race and ethnicity. Identification of genes associated with anxiety and depression will help in more targeted personalized treatments based on the patient’s genetic makeup. Mutations in regulator of gene protein signaling 1 (RGS1) protein have been associated with internalizing disorder in humans such as depression, anxiety, and OCD. Several studies have previously reported role of RGS1 in immune dysfunction. Interestingly, immune dysfunction has also been reported in patients suffering from depression. Importantly, in mice lacking RGS1 food chunking has been observed, which is suggestive of depression-like behavior. However, anxiety- and depression-like behavior has not been assessed in mice lacking RGS1. We will address this gap in knowledge by assessing anxiety-like (elevated plus maze) and depression-like behaviors (forced swim test and tail suspension) in mice lacking RGS1 and their wildtype counterparts. Based on the above described observation of food chunking, we hypothesize to see an increase in depression and anxiety in mice lacking RGS1. The data are currently being analyzed.