Advisor(s)

Jamie Hunsicker, DNP
Ohio Northern University
Health & Behavioral Sciences, Nursing
j-hunsicker@onu.edu

Megan Lieb, DNP
Ohio Northern University
Nursing, Health & Behavioral Sciences
m-lieb.2@onu.edu

Document Type

Poster

Start Date

23-4-2021 9:00 AM

Description

Problem: With growing evidence it is apparent that nurses do not check electrolyte lab results consistently and so miss or delay administering needed electrolyte replacements.

Methods: This evaluation project was a descriptive, correlational design. ICU stepdown nurses’ electrolyte knowledge and nursing interventions were measured pre-education and two weeks following education. Education on electrolyte nursing protocols was developed using recent literature and facility protocols. Both verbal education and pamphlet was used. Additionally, visual reminders on electrolyte replacement were placed in patient rooms.

Pertinent Findings: It is expected that this education will increase nurses’ knowledge of electrolyte protocols and decrease electrolyte medication administration errors.

Conclusion: Electrolyte education may be used as an intervention to increase nurses’ knowledge of safe electrolyte monitoring and administration. Checking electrolyte values before medication administration decreases the number of errors Reminders placed in all patient rooms may be one method to decrease medication errors.

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Apr 23rd, 9:00 AM

The Effects of Checking Electrolyte Values to Prevent Medication Errors.

Problem: With growing evidence it is apparent that nurses do not check electrolyte lab results consistently and so miss or delay administering needed electrolyte replacements.

Methods: This evaluation project was a descriptive, correlational design. ICU stepdown nurses’ electrolyte knowledge and nursing interventions were measured pre-education and two weeks following education. Education on electrolyte nursing protocols was developed using recent literature and facility protocols. Both verbal education and pamphlet was used. Additionally, visual reminders on electrolyte replacement were placed in patient rooms.

Pertinent Findings: It is expected that this education will increase nurses’ knowledge of electrolyte protocols and decrease electrolyte medication administration errors.

Conclusion: Electrolyte education may be used as an intervention to increase nurses’ knowledge of safe electrolyte monitoring and administration. Checking electrolyte values before medication administration decreases the number of errors Reminders placed in all patient rooms may be one method to decrease medication errors.