Faculty Advisor(s)

Heather E. McKiernan, Ph. D
The Center for Forensic Science Research and Education
heather.mckiernan@cfsre.org

Catherine O. Brown, MSFS
The Center for Forensic Science Research and Education
catherine.brown@cfsre.org

Document Type

Poster

Start Date

24-4-2020 9:00 AM

Description

In the United States a sexual assault is committed every 92 seconds. Due to limited funding, time, and other resources this has caused the US to accumulate a large sexual assault kit (SAK) backlog. In order to combat this backlog advanced methods for complete SAK testing are readily being developed. This study was done to compare a validated in-house method for co-extraction of DNA and proteins developed at the Center for Forensic Science Research and Education to previously validated methods developed by Kranes et. al. and the commercially available Qiagen AllPrep™ DNA/RNA/Protein Mini Kit. The three sample fractionation protocols were compared according to the following criteria: (1) peak area intensity observed via UPLC-MS/MS analysis for target protein biomarkers; (2) DNA quantification values; (3) overall quality of genetic profile obtained; (4) consistency among preparation replicates; and (5) speed/cost and ease of workflow. These data demonstrate that sufficient DNA and protein can be obtained from simulated sexual assault samples to allow for the simultaneous forensic analysis of each fraction, eliminating the need for forensic analysts to prioritize one type of testing over the other.

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM

Front-End Fractionation of DNA and Proteins for the Simultaneous Genetic and Serological Analysis of Sexual Assault Case Samples

In the United States a sexual assault is committed every 92 seconds. Due to limited funding, time, and other resources this has caused the US to accumulate a large sexual assault kit (SAK) backlog. In order to combat this backlog advanced methods for complete SAK testing are readily being developed. This study was done to compare a validated in-house method for co-extraction of DNA and proteins developed at the Center for Forensic Science Research and Education to previously validated methods developed by Kranes et. al. and the commercially available Qiagen AllPrep™ DNA/RNA/Protein Mini Kit. The three sample fractionation protocols were compared according to the following criteria: (1) peak area intensity observed via UPLC-MS/MS analysis for target protein biomarkers; (2) DNA quantification values; (3) overall quality of genetic profile obtained; (4) consistency among preparation replicates; and (5) speed/cost and ease of workflow. These data demonstrate that sufficient DNA and protein can be obtained from simulated sexual assault samples to allow for the simultaneous forensic analysis of each fraction, eliminating the need for forensic analysts to prioritize one type of testing over the other.